Vitamins And Vitamin Supplements: Use Increases In America

Truth Squad: Supplements for Eye Health

Darwin Deen, clinical professor in the department of family and social medicine at Albert Einstein College of Medicine in New York. “Our diet contains too many processed foods that do not have the nutrients we need to keep us healthy — soda and chips — so people respond by taking vitamins.” Deen said he usually advises his patients to increase their intake of fruits and vegetables to boost their vitamin count, rather than take a pill. “The pill is a nice idea, but we have no reason to think this one-size-fits-all dose makes any sense for each individual,” said Deen. Lead author Gahche said the report makes no recommendations on whether or not a person should or should not use dietary supplements. And if individuals are taking supplements, they should be sure to the tell their doctors what those are and why they’re taking them.
For the original version including any supplementary images or video, visit http://abcnews.go.com/Health/vitamins-vitamin-supplements-united-states/story?id=13359944

Names such as Seven Seas and Vitabiotics tap into families health concerns, but many of their products fail to deliver the promises on the packaging, according to a study. The health supplement industry is growing rapidly and now makes some 385million a year in the UK. However, the study by experts at consumer group Which? entitled Dont Believe The Hype found many of the claims made for these products are not only exaggerated and misleading, but may even be unauthorised.
For the original version including any supplementary images or video, visit http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2399370/Health-supplements-Which-says-firms-like-Seven-Seas-Vitabiotics-exaggerate-benefits.html

The great health supplements con: How firms like Seven Seas and Vitabiotics exaggerate benefits of pills used by millions says Which?

supplements

The 2001 clinical trial, sponsored by the National Eye Institute , also found that taking these supplements reduced the risk of vision loss caused by advanced age-related macular degeneration, or AMD, by about 19 percent. Supplements Still No Magic Bullet for Eye Health However, there is no evidence from this study to suggest that taking nutritional supplements can prevent people who currently do not have vision problems from getting AMD in the future, said Dr. Emily Chew, deputy director of the Division of Epidemiology and Clinical Research at the National Eye Institute, and a lead researcher in the AREDS study. According to the study, 50 milligrams daily of beta carotene, 500 milligrams daily of vitamin C, 400 international units of vitamin E, and 80 milligrams of zinc were found to be effective doses of each supplement. In general, many eye health experts may recommend supplements only for those who already experience specific types of vision loss, said Dr.
For the original version including any supplementary images or video, visit http://abcnews.go.com/Health/EyeHealth/supplements-eye-health-work/story?id=8871245

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